LONDON BOOKS
 flying the flag for free-thinking literature
London Books,
39 Lavender Gardens,
London SW11 1DJ

Email: info@london-books.co.uk
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LONDON BOOKS is an independent publisher which aims to bring old and new fiction together in a tradition that is original in its subject matter, style and social concerns. We believe that the marginalised fiction of the past can be as relevant and exciting today as when it was first published, and our classic reprints will reflect the language and politics of tougher eras, while our new fiction will focus on emerging authors with something to say and a novel way of getting their messages across.

Doctor Zipp’s Amazing Octo-Com

Morning Star,
October 2017
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Doctor Zipp’s inspiration

Camden New Journal,
September 2017
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Kersh’s Soho Blues

Morning Star,
September 2017
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Paul Duncan talks Kersh with Robert Elms

BBC Radio London,
September 2017
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The vivid style of Gerald Kersh

3:AM Magazine,
August 2017
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Prelude To A Certain Midnight – ‘brilliantly crafted’ Camden New Journal,
July 2017
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The Working Man’s Ballet – pioneering autobiography

July 2017,
The Sentinel
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John King on Bowie, Orwell & London Books

Creases Like Knives,
March 2017
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Taxi Driver inspired by Night And The City

The Guardian,
February 2017
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Max Décharné & Gilt Kid slang

The Guardian,
December 2016
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Justice For Joan reviewed

Church Times,
September 2016
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The Liberal Politics Of Adolf Hitler

Morning Star,
July 2016
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James Curtis biography

Kilburn & Willesden History
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Cathi Unsworth interview

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The Arundel Murder revisited

The Daily Express,
June 2016
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Justice For Joan – cold case subject of new book

Chichester Observer,
June 2016
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Martin Knight claims cover-up over unsolved murder

The Daily Mail,
June 2016
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Factory Records – John King interview

3:AM Magazine,
May 2016
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Book signing by Martin Knight receives threats

Littlehampton Gazette,
April 2016
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Justice For Joan review

Lynn News
April 2016
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Martin Knight presents Justice For Joan

Youtube
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Martin Knight calls for murder to be reinvestigated

Barnsley Chronicle
April 2016
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Alan Sillitoe celebrated in new anthology

January 2016
Morning Star
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Ultraviolet book launch

YouTube
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Noir of the week – It Always Rains On Sunday

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Simon Blumenfeld obituary

The Guardian
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Bob Crow – supporter of the London Classics

The Guardian
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Curtis credited with coining slang

The Independent,
November 2015
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It Always Rains On Sunday –
The novel and the film

Woody Haut Blog,
June 2015
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Martin Knight, Paul Willetts and Marc Glendening in conversation

The Writeidea Festival,
Bethnal Green, London
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It Always Rains On Sunday at
The East End Film Festival

Genesis Cinema,
July 2015
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Ultraviolet – Glastonbury tale
and contemporary classic

Camden New Journal,
June 2015
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London Books at the Horse Hospital

The Horse Hospital,
June 2015
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La Bern’s spiv city – on good authority

Crime Squad,
June 2015
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Lit Fiend meets Blueblagger

Lost Elation,
June 2015
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Arthur La Bern republished –
Cathi Unsworth interview

Camden New Journal,
June 2015
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May Day – Bob Crow &
John Sommerfield

Bishopsgate Institute,
March 2015
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Pioneering novelist of the underworld

Kilburn & Willesden History,
February 2015
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Doctor Of The Lost –
Barnardo and Britain in 2015

Bishopsgate Institute,
February 2015
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Simon Blumenfeld –
legendary writer

The Guardian,
January 2015
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London Books offer ‘something different’

The London Magazine,
June 2014
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A terrifically
evocative novel
Camden Review
May 2014
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London Classics at
Waterstones, Piccadilly
May 2014
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The London fiction
of James Curtis
London Fictions,
October 2013
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Kersh? A handsome edition,
an excellent introduction
Times Literary Supplement,
September 2013
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Jew Boy – thoughtful,
serious and honest
Benjamin Brill,
January 2012
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Another true
London classic

Woody Haut,
November 2011
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James Curtis:
The Slang King
Albion Magazine,
November 2011
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morning star

Morning Star
October 2011
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Camden New Journal,
September 2011
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KERSH - A GREAT
BRITISH WRITER
Independent On Sunday,
September 2011
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Resurrection
Of The Angel
3AM Magazine,
September 2011
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London classics at the Bishopsgate Institute 3AM Magazine,
September 2011
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LIKE A LOST
KINKS ALBUM

Benjamin Brill, September 2011
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Kersh London Books
The Word (Main)
01 September 2011
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Gypsy Joe the subject of programme on prejudice Gypsy Joe on Channel 4
Brentford Chronicle,
August 2011
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Harrogate Crime

writers festival
The Guardian,
July 2011
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A misplaced
May Day
dream for the masses

The Guardian,
May 2011
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TAXI DRIVER MEETS
GERALD KERSH
The Guardian,
May 2011
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night and the city article The Guardian (Review)
11 December 2010
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Likely lad Time Out Dubai
July 2010
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Cowsons

  & crumpet
Fictional Cities
July 2010
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Masters of

the craft
Crime Squad
July 2010
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Heading for a good read The Independent
July 2010
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‘Creating

xxHistory’
3:AM Magazine
May 2010
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Heading for a good read Camden New Journal
April 2010
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Heading for a good read

The Observer,
December 2009
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London Books in
Bethnal Green
East London Advertiser,
December 2009
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Heading for a good read East London Advertiser,
November 19 2009
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Community Care,
September 2009

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Independent On Sunday,
August 2009
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The Big Issue,
August 2009
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Harefield Gazette
July 2009
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Beautiful Game
I doubt whether any other competitor in
the various qualifying competitions for
the Open at Turnberry has ever fought a bare-knuckle fight, never mind one of nearly 45 minutes.
Times OnLine,
July 2009
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Fighting to go all the way
For the first part of this week, Joe Smith was at Broome Manor Golf Club, near Swindon, where he played in the Jamega Pro Tour event.
London Evening Standard,
June 2009
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No Ordinary Joe
Few men have led a more colourful, interesting life than Joe Smith. A golf professional and champion bare-knuckle fighter, he has done it all.
Uxbridge Gazette,
June 2009
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Classic Crime
With the recent fashion in simulating pre-WWII novels, the 1930s are generally regarded as the Golden Age of British crime fiction. This is the era of Christie and Sayers, crooked goings on at the manor with the gentleman thief and the generously moustachioed detective in hot pursuit.

Cathi Unsworth
Crime Squad
June 2009
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Ten best talks & festivals
Iain Sinclair
The novelist is joined by Paul Willetts, the biographer of Julian Maclaren-Ross, for an exploration of two of the lesser-known chroniclers of London life: James Curtis and Robert Westerby. UCL, London WC1

The Independant
16 May 2009

Literatura de las aceras
En vísperas de Sant Jordi, un repaso por la literatura proletaria y marginal estadounidense, británica y española....
La Vanguardia.es
30 April 2009
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Tales from mean streets
There were Eastenders on screen long before there was EastEnders. Iain SInclair on the small area of LOndon that boats a powerful, vital cinematic mythology...

The Guardian Film and Music
24 April 2009
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Night and the City by Gerald Kersh
Kersh's London classic proves that an English author could write crime fiction in the 1930s every bit as hard-boiled as his Amercian contemporaries – and without having to do a Raymond Chandler and hop across the Atlantic. Small-time Soho con and pimp Harry Fabian faces two problems. First, the police are cleaning up the streets in preparation for the coronation of George VI and Harry is in their sights. Second, he needs money, about £100 - not a huge sum, even in the 1930s, but enough to drag him ever deeoer into the seedy underworld of the capital's clip joints, jazz clubs and all-night cafés. A shocking read from a much-neglected writer.
The Guardian Review
21 Feb
Andrew McCallum, London.

The Gilt Kid
James Curtis is new to me, but he seems
to have been been quite a success in the short period between the wars before fading almost completely from view. He died in 1977, having produced nothing for years. London have provided plenty of background in the introduction and notes...
www.laurahird.com
Feb 09
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London Books
London Books is a new publishing company bringing forgotten London literature back into print. Authors John
King and Martin Knight launched the project last year with two smartly
designed hardbacks...
Book and Magazine Collector
Jan 09
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Wide Boys Never Work
Shorty is a petty criminal in 1930s London. In the opening pages he is released from Pentonville Prison "as wide a boy as they made them"...
Financial Tmes
20 December 2008
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Wide Boys Never Work
About a quarter if the way into this resissued novel from 1937 about a likely lad who leaves his job in a car factory up north adn falls in with a gang lo London swindlers...

Time Out
18 December 2008
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Wide Boys Never Work
The seventeenth century Puritan Perkins wrote that washing up and preaching were both equal in the eye of God. If you have a Gift, get a calling

3:AM Magazine
13 December 2008. MORE >>


Trucks, tarts and tea leaves.
With financial pundits drawing inevitable parallels between the economic meltdown of today and the depression of the 1930s, the arrival of They Drive by Night by James Curtis is particuarly timely...
Truck & Driver
Jan 2009
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Stories from the City and tales from the underground
JAMES Curtis was a figure known in the pubs along ­Kilburn High Road, always happy to pass the time of day over a pint, and earning a living as a school caretaker.
But few who raised a pint with him

The Review - BOOKS
and
Islington Tribune

27 November 2008
MORE >>


Books of the Year
The tiny independent firm of London Books, founded last year, specialises in reprints of hard-boiled thrillers from the interwar years....

The Spectator
15 November 2008
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Resurrecting a lost era of working-class fiction
Readers of books blogs past will have seen plenty of material on the joys of mugging up on forgotten authors and of sharing your favourite undiscovered books.
As Billy Mills pointed out, such activity is full of obscure pleasure.

From Guardian Books Blog

November, 14 2008
Sam Jordison
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Wide Boys Never Work
The fourth in a series resurrecting long-lost, London-based novels, Wide Boys Never Work was first published in 1937...

Financial Times
(Life and Arts)
25 October 2008
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Hot news from John King’s London Books stable, who continue to tirelessly slog to rehabilitate some of the capital’s best forgotten fiction of the pre-war era....

3:AM Magazine
Sun, October 26th, 2008.
MORE >>
www.3ammagazine.com


Dark tales and means streets
Literary journalists often mourn the passing of 'the gentleman publisher', swept aside by the jackbooted advance of corporate publishing. By Paul Willetts
Eastern Daily Press
04th October 2008
download pdf>>

The start of Alan Sillitoe
How Sillitoe stood apart from the tradition of Northern novelists going soft and successful in the South
The Times Literary Supplement
1st October 2008
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Man in a Macintosh
For more than 30 years, Iain SInclair has been on the trail of Roland Camberton, the great invisible of English fiction, who wrote two highly praised London novels in the 1950s, and then vanished. When a clue recently dropped on his doorstep, he was finally on his way to solving the mystery

The Guardian Review
30th August 2008
download pdf (2.9mb)


Peter Owen has Sillitoe biography
Peter Owen is to publish Professor Richard Bradford's authorised biography of Alan Sillitoe. The Life of a Long-Distance Writer (£25, hardback) will be released in September, to coincide with the author's eightieth birthday and with the fortieth anniversary re-publication of his classic Saturday Night and Sunday Morning by HarperCollins. Sillitoe, whose novel A Start in Life was reissued earlier this year by London Books, was recently voted among the top 50 most important English writers in a survey by The Times.
Publishing News
24 June 2008

Night & Day by Gerald Kersh
with an introduction by John King


March saw the sad passing of both Richard Widmark and Jules Dassin, lead actor and director respectively of the cult film noir, Night and The City. The groundbreaking novel (which Jules Dassin admittted he never read till after the film was made!) is now re-published by London Books.

One of the greatest of the London lowlife novels, Night And The City is the work of a tough, street-wise character who was also a prolific author, his powers of description matched by his insights into human nature. Gerald Kersh was a familiar face in thirties Soho and then a deserter in the Second World War - post-war he was a writer beloved by peers such as Anthony Burgess but hounded by creditors who tracked him to various abodes in New York State.

One of his few satisfying moments was the sale of the film rights to Night and the City - it was actually filmed twice, once in 1950 with Widmark and again in the 1990s starring Robert De Niro and Jessica Lange. But this fine book doubles as a social document, capturing the colour and excitement of a vanished London. In his new introduction John King, author of The Football Factory conveys the mystique and allure of this seminal British author, whose works will continue to be published by London Books.

www.dublininspired.ie
01 May 2008


Fame and Fortune: Alan Sillitoe
The author, poet and one-time Angry Young Man says his work should matter more than the cash
From The Sunday Times
May 18, 2008 MORE >>

Cover Stories: Miller editions; Cambridge Wordfest; agencies deal; Foyles again

For the first time since his death in 2005, new editions of the works of Arthur Miller will be published by Methuen Drama, now part of A&C Black, in a joint venture with the playwright's Estate....

The Literator
Friday, 21 March 2008
MORE >>

The Times

A Start in life
MORE >>


Evening Standard


The Londoner's Diary

04/04/08


The Guardian Online
theblogbooks

04/04/08

Happy Birthday Mr Sillitoe
MORE >>


The Sunday Telegraph

02/04/08

Alan Sillitoe's Heaven On Earth
MORE >>


The Guardian (review)

01/04/08

The common touch
In the 1950s, Alan Sillitoe shattered the sentimental portrayal of working-class... MORE >>


East Anglian Daily Times

28/02/08

Alan Sillitoe made his name writing about the folk living and woking in 1950s backstreet housing and factories - work that still seems fresh today... MORE >>


Eastern Daily Press

27/02/08

Alan Sillitoe talks to Angi Kennedy on the eve of his 80th birthday

MORE >>


DJTaylor
The Independant on Sunday.

30/12/07

London Books

MORE >>


FT.com

Night and the City reviewed by Judith Evans

15/12/07

MORE >>


New Statesman

15/11/07

Red wine and a new beginning
MORE >>


Publishing News

08/07

New publisher to focus on London literature

MORE >>


Nude
08/12/07

Night and the City

MORE >>


First released in 1936 and given a special reprint by London Books, The Gilt Kid follows the adventures of a young burglar fresh out of prison. MORE >>

Crime fiction has had a great year, despite some sad loses. MORE >>

The novelist James Curtis has been missing for more than 50 years. His success, which burned brightly but rapidly, came in a meteoric burst in the mid-1930s MORE >>

I welcomed the reissue, with new introductions, of two clasics of London lowlife MORE >>

I've read a lot of crime novels over the years but never before one in which an explanation of Marx's Labour Theory of Value is attempted on one page. MORE >>

'Night and the City' is one of the best 'Soho novels', but its author Gerald Kersh is a forgotten figure. John O'Connell wonders why...
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Authors John King and Martin Knight are launching London Books, a new independent specialising primarily in "gritty and realist" fiction set in London, much of which has been out of print for years....
MORE >>

From the opening scene it grabs you. You feel yourself being dragged through a thicket of urban undergrowth. Night and the City by Gerald Kersh lurches from comedy to menace, vivid description to rapid-fire dialogue...
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